#ocaml

Rulesets (5)

Rules (33)

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'input_line' leaves a '\r' (CR) character when reading lines from a Windows text file, whose lines end in "\r\n" (CRLF). This is a problem for any Windows file that is being read either on a Unix-like platform or on Windows in binary mode. If the code already takes care of removing any trailing '\r' after reading the line, add a '(* nosemgrep *)' comment to disable this warning.

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This code contains bidirectional (bidi) characters. While this is useful for support of right-to-left languages such as Arabic or Hebrew, it can also be used to trick language parsers into executing code in a manner that is different from how it is displayed in code editing and review tools. If this is not what you were expecting, please review this code in an editor that can reveal hidden Unicode characters.

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'open_in' behaves differently on Windows and on Unix-like systems with respect to line endings. To get the same behavior everywhere, use 'open_in_bin' or 'open_in_gen [Open_binary]'. If you really want CRLF-to-LF translations to take place when running on Windows, use 'open_in_gen [Open_text]'.

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'open_out' behaves differently on Windows and on Unix-like systems with respect to line endings. To get the same behavior everywhere, use 'open_out_bin' or 'open_out_gen [Open_binary]'. If you really want LF-to-CRLF translations to take place when running on Windows, use 'open_out_gen [Open_text]'.

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You should not re-raise exceptions using 'raise' because it loses track of where the exception was raised originally, leading to a useless and possibly confusing stack trace. Instead, you should obtain a stack backtrace as soon as the exception is caught using 'try ... with exn -> let trace = Printexc.get_raw_backtrace () in ...', and keep it around until you re-raise the exception using 'Printexc.raise_with_backtrace exn trace'. You must collect the stack backtrace before calling another function which might internally raise and catch exceptions. To avoid false positives from Semgrep, write 'raise (Foo args)' instead of 'let e = Foo args in raise e'.